Thursday, August 17, 2017

Are you ready for an earthquake? New infographic can help keep you safe

It’s a beautiful day and you’re leaving your home for the day.

Suddenly, the ground starts to shake: It’s an earthquake! Do you know what to do?

Earthquakes are more common than you think. And they don’t just happen on the West Coast. Globally, there are 500,000 detectable earthquakes every year, the U.S. Geological Survey says. Only about 100,000 of those can be felt, and 100 cause damage.

Though you may not have heard about them in the news, there were earthquakes in California, Greece, Peru, Russia and other countries in the past month. People in Oklahoma experienced seven earthquakes in 28 hours in early August, causing power outages.

With so many earthquakes, it’s important to know what to do beforehand. Which is why our new Get Ready infographic is so handy.

It tells you what to do before, during and after an earthquake. The infographic is great for hanging on your bulletin board or the fridge at home, work or school.

Learn more about preparing for earthquakes with Get Ready’s earthquake fact sheet and check out our other awesome preparedness infographics.

Remember, earthquakes can strike at any time, so be prepared to drop, cover and hold on!

Tuesday, August 08, 2017

Foodborne illness: Spend your summer outdoors, not in the bathroom

Summertime means fun in the sun, but it can also bring foodborne illness. (Blech!) No one wants to spend their summer with an upset stomach — or worse. So what can you do to prevent it?

In our latest podcast, the Get Ready team interviews Glenn Morris, director of the Emerging Pathogens Institute at the University of Florida, to find out.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that about 1 in 6 Americans is affected by foodborne illness each year, adding up to roughly 48 million people. Unfortunately, warm summer weather can make it easier for germs to flourish in your food.

“When bacteria are hot, they grow,” Morris says. “And when they grow, they increase the likelihood that they are going to be able to increase illness.”

If you’re planning to have a picnic or family cookout this summer, Morris recommends that you use two separate cutting boards for food prep. You’ll want one for raw food and one for cooked foods and produce, so germs don’t spread. Also, don’t forget to wash your hands!

“This seems very basic,” Morris said. “But a lot of the pathogens that can get onto or into foods are carried by hands. So always wash your hands before you prepare food.

Other tips? Make sure to keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. And ensure that your meats are cooked to a safe temperature. That means that all hamburger meat should be cooked to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit and chicken cooked to at least 165 degrees.

Morris also shares information on the difference between a medium-rare steak and a medium-rare hamburger. Why is one OK to eat while the other is not? Listen to this episode of our Get Ready Report to find out!

The Get Ready Report can be found for free on any podcast app on your smartphone, including iTunes, so subscribe now to get updates on our latest episodes.